JAWS Alert Manager (JAM)
Doug Lee
Last Revised November, 2020

The JAWS Alert Manager (JAM) is a set of JAWS scripts aimed at giving JAWS users control over the handling of Windows and application alert messages. This document describes JAM and how to use it. This document can be opened by typing JAWSKey+/ followed by F1.

Table of Contents

System Requirements For JAWS Users

The following requirements apply for JAWS users:

Script Installation Instructions

To install these scripts on a new system:

  1. Load JAWS if this has not already been done. This will require administrative privileges on the computer.
  2. Run JAWS as the user for whom the scripts are to be installed. This and the following steps must be performed for each user of the computer who will be using JAWS with these scripts.
  3. Download and run, or run directly, the installer for these scripts; and follow the on-screen directions. Be sure to install the scripts in the currently running JAWS version if a JAWS version list is presented.
  4. To verify successful installation, type JAWSKey+/ followed by Q. Part of the JAWS spoken response should be a revision number. If you do not hear a revision number, the scripts are not correctly loaded. In some cases, restarting JAWS may fix this issue.

Key Sequences

These scripts incorporate commands that consist of sequences of keystrokes, all beginning with a common prefix, or "command keystroke." This approach allows many script commands without the risk of conflicting with application keystrokes. See the "Multi-Key Command Sequences" section of the "Common Script Elements" document for further details, including how to explore the available script commands (similar to exploring a menu system), and how to change the Command keystroke if necessary.

By default, the Command keystroke for these scripts is JAWSKey+/. This document may refer to this keystroke as JAWSKey+/ or Command; so, for example, JAWSKey+/ Tab and Command Tab both refer to typing the prefix keystroke, then separately the Tab key. Some sequences may consist of more than two keystrokes, or "levels"; for example, JAWSKey+/ d r would refer to typing JAWSKey+/, then d, then finally r.

Script Commands and Features

These scripts provide the following commands and features for users:

For the more technically inclined, and for those who wish to help with JAM development by providing information, JAM offers a few further conveniences:

Alert Shortening During Relative Navigation

The following script feature is turned off by default and may be toggled on and off via Command R.

During relative navigation through notifications, JAM can abbreviate each notification by removing from its start and end whatever start and end were spoken as part of the previous notification. This tends to reduce repetitions of application names, text channel and sender names, trailing button text, etc. as you move through a series of notifications from the same origin. Beware, though, that this can also remove actual content from what is spoken. A famous example of this extra removal occurs when two notifications from a Windows Store update follow each other and are then read via relative navigation. Imagine that the following two notifications are encountered during navigation, in this order:

12:14 New notification from Microsoft Store, Xbox Game Bar, Just got updated, check it out.
12:14 Microsoft Store, App Installer, Just got updated, check it out.
With the extra shortening in effect, JAM will announce them thus:
12:14 New notification from Microsoft Store, Xbox Game Bar, Just got updated, check it out.
12:14 App Installer,
Use Command K or Command NumPad5 to read the entire current notification without any extra shortening.

Notification shortening applies only during relative navigation and among notifications reached via that command set. Use of sequences like Command 1 (most recent notification) does not affect this shortening feature; and speech on notification arrival is not abbreviated in this way.

Known Issues

The following issues are known and may be encountered during use of the application with these JAWS scripts. These issues may be fixed in a future update to the scripts or to the application itself.

Some alerts that should be shortened may be left unchanged. The author considers this safer than accidentally cutting important text out of an alert as a result of trying too hard to make all alerts shorter.

When the scripts are removed, the alert data is not. This is harmless and will not impair uninstallation, future reinstallation, or computer operation. If you later re-install the scripts, the alerts you previously stored will again be available. Removing the alert store during uninstallation would cause all alerts to be lost on every script upgrade. The alert store may be deleted manually by removing folder "%APPDATA%\JAWS Alert Manager" and its contents. If you have saved filters or other configuration settings for JAM, these will be removed by deleting this folder as well.

Braille support is not well tested and is likely incomplete.

Fun Notes

The name JAM is an acronym for "JAWS Alert Manager." It is also convenient, however, that it is good at jamming the transmission of duplicate alerts. For this reason, the author considers both "JAM" and "Jam" spellings appropriate for the utility.

Revision History

This is the revision history of these scripts, most recent revision first:

Revision 74, released November 22, 2020

Revision 73, released November 19, 2020

Note: For correct operation of new commands, this script update must be installed via the installer rather than via the Command Shift+U sequence.

Revision 66, released October 31, 2020